Wednesday, July 1, 2009

Quite Possibly The Cutest Animal On The Planet

I saw this the other day when I was perusing the web, and I am in LOVE.
It's called a Slow Loris. (love love love love)
And thanks to YouTube, I found MORE videos of the Slow Loris.
At the very least, click on the first one,
cuz gee, nobody should have to go through life without seeing one of these. They are so CUTE.
What is a Slow Loris? You can scroll down to the bottom where I've put some information, if your interested. Enjoy!









The slow lorises are three species of loris and are classified as the genus Nycticebus. These slow moving creatures range from Borneo and the southern Philippines in Southeast Asia, through Bangladesh, Vietnam, Indonesia, India (North Eastern India, Bengal), southern China (Yunnan area) and Thailand. They are classified as vulnerable or endangered species, and are hunted for their large eyes which are prized for local traditional medicine. The Indonesian name, malu malu, can be translated as "shy one". They are listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Slow lorises are nocturnal and arboreal animals that prefer the tops of the trees, occurring mostly in tropical/subtropical rain forests and bamboo thickets. They have slow, deliberate movements and a powerful grasp that makes them very difficult to remove from branches, especially because they only remove (at most) one limb from the branch at any given moment. They live as solitaries or in small family groups, and mark their territory with urine. Lorises whistle loudly to each other, using a single note, while foraging.

Slow lorises can produce a toxin which they mix with their saliva and use as protection against enemies. Mothers will lick this toxin onto their offspring before leaving them to search for food. The toxin is produced by glands on the insides of their elbows - the brachial region. The lorises suck it into their mouths and deliver it when they bite or lick. The toxin is not known to be fatal to humans, but causes a painful swelling. If the toxin does not deter a predator, the slow loris will often drop from the branch to the ground and roll into a protective ball.

Slow lorises can produce a toxin which they mix with their saliva and use as protection against enemies. Mothers will lick this toxin onto their offspring before leaving them to search for food. The toxin is produced by glands on the insides of their elbows - the brachial region. The lorises suck it into their mouths and deliver it when they bite or lick. The toxin is not known to be fatal to humans, but causes a painful swelling. If the toxin does not deter a predator, the slow loris will often drop from the branch to the ground and roll into a protective ball.

Slow lorises are opportunistic carnivores, typically eating insects, mollusks, lizards, bird eggs, and small vertebrates. With their slow quiet movements, they creep to their prey, in order to catch it with a lightning-quick snatch using both hands. They will also eat fruits and leaves. Slow lorises are not strongly territorial.

Slow lorises are polygamous and breed throughout the year. After an approximately 190-day gestation, the female births one (or rarely two) young, typically limited to one or two litters per year. The newborn clasps itself to the belly of the mother, or occasionally the father. When it is older it will be "parked" on a branch while its parent searches for food. After approximately six to nine months it is weaned. Sexual maturity is achieved around 10 to 24 months. The life expectancy of the slow loris is up to 14 years in the wild and up to 26 years in captivity.

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